Breast-Cancer Tumor Size, Overdiagnosis, and Mammography Screening Effectiveness

 

BACKGROUND

The goal of screening mammography is to detect small malignant tumors before they grow large enough to cause symptoms. Effective screening should therefore lead to the detection of a greater number of small tumors, followed by fewer large tumors over time.

METHODS

We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, 1975 through 2012, to calculate the tumor-size distribution and size-specific incidence of breast cancer among women 40 years of age or older. We then calculated the size-specific cancer case fatality rate for two time periods: a baseline period before the implementation of widespread screening mammography (1975 through 1979) and a period encompassing the most recent years for which 10 years of follow-up data were available (2000 through 2002).

RESULTS

After the advent of screening mammography, the proportion of detected breast tumors that were small (invasive tumors measuring <2 cm or in situ carcinomas) increased from 36% to 68%; the proportion of detected tumors that were large (invasive tumors measuring ≥2 cm) decreased from 64% to 32%. However, this trend was less the result of a substantial decrease in the incidence of large tumors (with 30 fewer cases of cancer observed per 100,000 women in the period after the advent of screening than in the period before screening) and more the result of a substantial increase in the detection of small tumors (with 162 more cases of cancer observed per 100,000 women). Assuming that the underlying disease burden was stable, only 30 of the 162 additional small tumors per 100,000 women that were diagnosed were expected to progress to become large, which implied that the remaining 132 cases of cancer per 100,000 women were overdiagnosed (i.e., cases of cancer were detected on screening that never would have led to clinical symptoms). The potential of screening to lower breast cancer mortality is reflected in the declining incidence of larger tumors. However, with respect to only these large tumors, the decline in the size-specific case fatality rate suggests that improved treatment was responsible for at least two thirds of the reduction in breast cancer mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

Although the rate of detection of large tumors fell after the introduction of screening mammography, the more favorable size distribution was primarily the result of the additional detection of small tumors. Women were more likely to have breast cancer that was overdiagnosed than to have earlier detection of a tumor that was destined to become large. The reduction in breast cancer mortality after the implementation of screening mammography was predominantly the result of improved systemic therapy.

Disclosure forms provided by the authors are available with the full text of this article at NEJM.org.

The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not constitute official positions of the U.S. Government or the National Cancer Institute.

SOURCE INFORMATION

From the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Lebanon (H.G.W., A.J.O.), and the Departments of Medicine (H.G.W.) and Biomedical Data Science (A.J.O.), Geisel School of Medicine, Hanover — both in New Hampshire; and the Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (P.C.P., B.S.K.).

Address reprint requests to Dr. Welch at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, 35 Centerra Pkwy., HB 7251, Lebanon, NH 03766, or at.

Fuente: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1600249

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